Experts Agree … More Is Not Necessarily Better

Less is betterThe quest for more truth and honesty in Probiotics took a great leap forward at the Probiota 2014 conference in Amsterdam earlier this month. Event chairman and renowned probiotics expert Professor Gregor Reid highlighted that little is known about the way different species of bacteria interact, citing evidence that many multi-strain probiotics are less effective than those containing just a few strains, because some strains will inhibit the activity of others when placed together.

He warned that “The tendency is ‘let’s have 15 strains’ … ‘let’s have 28 billion’, “You’ve got to know what they’re doing. Are they really having an impact?”. For more details of Professor Reid’s comments, read the full article here.

So who is Professor Gregor Reid? He is one of the leading experts in the field of Probiotics. He is a Professor at the University of Western Ontario, but more impressively, he has been the chairperson of the United Nations / World Health Organization Expert Panel and Working Group on Probiotics.

From all of us at Natren Probiotics, we have a message for Professor Reid:

THANK YOU!!!! 

This is a great wake-up call for the industry and we hope that other probiotic suppliers take note of these comments. Our Founder and President, Natasha Trenev, has been advocating this position for over 30 years.  You can read more about Natren’s take on the negative effects of combining too many unproven multi-strain bacteria species here in our multi-strain white paper.

We also approve of Professor Reid’s comments that many probiotic manufacturers are misleading the public by claiming that their products contain a prebiotic, when the reality is that the levels are so low there are no benefits.

Natasha goes on to say many of the different, so called probiotic products are made by contract manufacturers that specialize in producing bulk multi-strain probiotic products.  The consumer needs to be aware that a vast majority of these multi-strain probiotics are sold under different brand names in health food stores and on the Internet.  Additionally, Natren believes that many of the supplements claiming prebiotic benefits are in fact loaded with FOS, or Inulin, a sugar that can have undesirable side effects such as excessive gas and bloating.

It is great to see experts agree in this area. We fully support Professor Reid’s statements at the conference and we hope that others join the effort to create probiotic supplements that are grounded in scientific fact and analytical study, and not distracted by the “numbers game” of consumer marketing.