The Kombucha Kraze

From home brewing kits to the refrigerator aisles of major supermarkets, kombucha is one of the newer health crazes on the market. It seems like every company is making one, and they can be found everywhere. Entire refrigerator sections are dedicated solely to kombucha these days. Once you walk past the huge array of cold brews and coffee drinks, and then iced teas… Boom!

The question is, is kombucha healthy?

Kombucha – What Is It Exactly?

Actually, the first question should be, what is kombucha? So let’s start with that. Kombucha is a fermented, effervescent drink that is pushed as having health benefits. It is also often called kombucha tea, and is made by fermenting tea with a culture of bacteria and yeast. However, there is not a lot of scientific evidence to support the health claims. And while rare, there are potential adverse side effects that you should be aware of.

Drinking Dangers

Like everything else in life, the more you know, the better off you are. Knowledge is power and understanding.  Some kombucha drinks can have elevated alcohol levels, which resulted in Whole Foods temporarily pulling the drinks from their stores for a while in 2010.  The alcohol content is usually less than one percent, but increases with fermentation time. If you have a drinking problem, avoiding kombucha may be necessary.

Kombucha is not recommended for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding. For those who have diabetes, the tea could affect blood sugar levels, so you need to monitor your levels carefully if drinking kombucha. And because it contains caffeine, kombucha can worse diarrhea and IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome). If you have a week immune system, kombucha can support the growth of fungus and bad bacteria, which can lead to infections.

Home Brew Kits

Making beer in your garage or house has become a fast growing hobby. In fact, many successful microbreweries have started this way. Beer making kits are a popular holiday gift, and now kombucha making kits for the home brewer are also easily available. One of the dangers that home brewers face is cleanliness. Professional brewers and breweries have to be meticulous in order to keep a germ-free environment, but this is not easily achieved at home. While it may sound like a great idea to “make your own,” you probably don’t want your beverages contaminated with fungus and bad bacteria.

Better Bacteria

While fermented foods have potential health benefits, kombucha and the brewing process is more like rocket science, or at least it should be treated as such. Making kombucha should be conducted by knowledgeable and credible individuals. For those who regularly drink it, you should consider the potential side effects, especially since the health benefits are questionable and not backed up with a lot of scientific evidence.

Defining your specific health wants and needs is the first step to take. Consulting a doctor is always advised, especially when starting a new workout or diet regimen. Visiting a site like Natren.com will not only provide you with a great range of products, but will also have articles and information on probiotics and how they can help you achieve your goals.

No Shortcuts

There is not one and only one end-all to fixing your health issues. And there are no shortcuts to good health. With kombucha, the genie is most likely NOT in the bottle.

Obviously, Natren recommends their probiotics, but also with getting enough sleep, eating well and exercising. These are all important to your overall wellbeing. Keeping your body functioning at its highest level is essential.

So you may just want to kick the kombucha. With little to no side effects, probiotics boost the immune system, can help with diarrhea and IBS and have been proven to help with digestion and digestive issues. They are a safe and welcome addition to your daily regimen and are good for you and the entire family, including your pets.